Boss Reporters Provide A Better Record

Boss Reporters Provide A Better Record

December 15, 2010

Donna also is concerned about a growing trend of law firms – many unknowingly — hiring individuals that call themselves court reporters yet are not trained as stenographic court reporters. Several court reporting agencies send in people to digitally record the proceedings. Those recordings are then sent to another group of people — often overseas — to transcribe the proceedings.

The Fort Myers online newspaper, Examiner.com, recently ran a piece about the changing face of court reporting. “A written record of an event lends itself well to later study, more so than audio or video,” states the article. “Then there is the fact that technology does go wrong sometimes.

A secret hearing related to the Oklahoma City bombing was recorded using audio, with no court reporter present. It was later found that the equipment was either not switched on properly or had malfunctioned, and the tape was blank. These kinds of incidents cannot be allowed to happen in a court. “

“All professional stenographic reporters require a stenographic machine, as that’s the backup,” explained Donna, who believes complaints are mounting in her industry. “Clients must start asking these critical questions: How are your reporters trained? Who handles the transcripts? What is the accuracy?”

“We are proud of the integrity of our organization and are determined to maintain our high-level of ethics,” she added.